Alpacas as an Investment

If you are still wondering if investing in alpacas is a wise investment… consider the following article on Feb 4, 2012 from Smart Money Today.

Alpacas as an Investment

“You may have heard that Alpacas make a great investment because of their high annual yields of fiber and the lucrative income it can provide. But did you also know that the tax code makes offers for huge benefits to Alpaca owners?

Whether you’re an individual with the ability to raise an Alpaca for fiber on a small farm or breed alpacas to shear or sell on a larger area of land, the tax code is full of deductions that will make investing in an Alpaca even more profitable than many other forms of investment.

Section 179** of the tax code allows for taxpayers to begin claiming deductions for some capital assets, the things purchased as investments toward profits, as soon as they are purchased. Alpacas are among the limited number of purchased investments that are included in this section. These are benefits that you will not be eligible to receive if you put money toward a traditional investment opportunity, like buying stock or a CD.

If you own an Alpaca for over a year, it is subject to capital gains tax, like most other investments. Capital gains are profits from an investment that has been resold. Your initial livestock will be subject to this provision if you sell them, as will any offspring from your livestock.

At the end of the day, Alpacas are a form of investment that offer significant and unique tax deductions that will start benefitting you as an investor right away. As long as you keep them, you won’t need to pay capital gains taxes, so Alpacas can be a great long-term investment opportunity. Or, if you choose to sell them, take the profit and pay the capital gains taxes on the sale, you still come out ahead—you will have accumulated enough tax benefits between the time of purchase and the sale to compensate for paying livestock capital gains taxes on your Alpacas.”

Add to all of this that alpacas are 100% insurable. Can stocks do all of this?

(Make sure that you consult a tax advisor for specifics as they relate to you.)

**February 8th, 2012 – The “Tax Relief Act of 2010” and the “Jobs Act of 2010” had a substantial positive impact on Section 179 for the 2012 Tax Year – below is quoted from “section179.org”:

  • 2012 Deduction Limit – $139,000
  • 2012 Limit on Capital Purchases – $560,000
  • 2012 Bonus Depreciation – extended the 50% bonus depreciation on qualified assets placed in service during 2012

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